When a British judge is sent back to Morocco to rule on a controversial UK extradition request, a young Moroccan girl will be the first of many to be affected

Theresa May’s decision to return British court judge Camille Lularoe back to Britain after her arrest in Morocco in May has sparked outrage and calls for the UK to end her stay.In the wake of the arrest, the British Home Secretary and Home Office have ordered a review of the decision, with Ms Lularo set…

Published by admin inAugust 19, 2021
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Theresa May’s decision to return British court judge Camille Lularoe back to Britain after her arrest in Morocco in May has sparked outrage and calls for the UK to end her stay.

In the wake of the arrest, the British Home Secretary and Home Office have ordered a review of the decision, with Ms Lularo set to take part in the court case later this month.

The case has drawn international attention after her lawyer, Michael Barrett, said her release was “an act of justice”.

“This was a very difficult case and it was an act of injustice,” he said.

“We were absolutely disappointed that a British court, in a jurisdiction where she is not a resident, had to return her to a country where she was not a citizen.”

The decision has drawn widespread condemnation from around the world.

Ms Lulu has not been able to visit her family in Britain since her arrest and has said she is now worried about returning to the UK.

“I am concerned about returning home,” she said.

A Home Office spokesperson said Ms Lula’s arrest was “unnecessary and unnecessary”.

“The British Government has no plans to return Ms Lulesa to Morocco, where she has no legal status,” the spokesperson said.

UK law currently states that an extradition request must be made to a UK court before the UK can extradite someone to a foreign country, regardless of whether they are UK citizens or not.

A British court had refused to extradite Ms Lulo, saying her extradition was an “act of injustice”.

The UK High Court ruled that Ms Luleo should be released because she had no “material links” to the United Kingdom.

She was arrested in Morocco after she went to the British consulate in Amman, Jordan, to apply for asylum in March.

“She’s not the type of person who would be a candidate for deportation,” Mr Barrett told Al Jazeera.

The UK government said in a statement that it was “confident” that Ms Langue, who is now 25, was a good candidate for a deportation.

“Our extradition process is fair, transparent and rigorous, and we are confident that her application will be successful,” it said.